Joy Berry: Visioning For the Future of Religious Education and Family Ministry

I love the way Joy thinks about religious education and thoroughly enjoyed reading her words.

Within, Among, Beyond

Meme-JoyBlog

Everywhere I turn, conversation about the future of the church and organized religion and even Unitarian Universalism in America is happening. Some believe faith communities are in danger of extinction; some believe that it’s only a matter of time, unless we chart a new course. I believe that people always have been and always will be in need of sacred spaces and experiences, a tribe, and a way to make meaning of their lives.  (And help with the children, forever and ever, amen.)  Whether we have the will and the energy to make sure our churches can still do all those things is an open question, but a hopeful one. After all, it’s ours to do, and no one can stop us, should we decide to focus our energy on making the church more responsive, more finely tuned to the needs of today’s congregants. We can decide to consider how…

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Mamma Dog and the Pile of Yarn

outreach centerThis morning, at my church, we held a ribbon cutting ceremony for our new Community Outreach Center.  The center is an expansion of the Matthew 25:40 Mission that has been a part of our church’s work in the community.  The mission literally grew out of it’s Director’s (Mark Cook) trunk.  The Outreach Center will provide a warming center during the day for our community’s homeless population while connecting people in need to the support and services they need.

As part of the church service that preceded the ribbon cutting, the kids participated in a Blessing of the Blankets.  Just before Rev. Christana Wille McKnight lead the congregation in the blessing, I got to tell this story:

Once upon a time, on a day very much like today – rainy, windy and cold – there was a dog who didn’t have a place to live.  On this rainy, windy, cold day the dog laid down in an alleyway to get a little relief from the weather.  Nearby was a pile of yarn that someone had thrown away.  The pile of yarn saw the dog and rolled over to it and tried to cover the shivering animal.  It meant well and it tried really hard.  It helped a bit.  The dog felt a little warmer and a little drier and was grateful for the effort.  But still, the dog was damp and chilly.

Later that evening, a young woman cut through the alleyway on her way home and saw the dog, covered in yarn, shivering quietly.  She picked up the dog, yarn and all, and brought her home.  While the dog huddled in the corner of the kitchen, the young woman gathered up all the yarn and brought it to her loom.  Turns out the woman was an artist and had a real skill for weaving.  Within a few hours she wove that yarn – in and out, left and right – until she had woven a beautiful blanket.  When she was finished, she took that blanket to the corner of the kitchen, wrapped up the dog and went to bed. puppies under blanket

In the morning, the young woman came down to the kitchen to find that the dog had given birth to 3 adorable puppies.  The blanket was now wrapped around the Momma dog and her 3 puppies, keeping the whole family warm.

What makes a blanket different from a pile of yarn is vision, leadership and organization.  We must always be grateful to those who share their vision, extend their leadership and bring organization to our pile of efforts.  For it is through these gifts that our pile of yarn becomes more beautiful, more durable and more effective.

More Love Somewhere: The unedited hymn

A wonderfully thoughtful and inspired piece about this beautiful song and our propensity to change the lyrics.

Held In The Light

I have long been uneasy with a recent practice among Unitarian Universalists of singing changed words to a particular song in Singing the Living Tradition, the hymnal published by the Unitarian Universalist Association.

Granted, we are always changing words to make them more palatable and therefore singable in our congregations. We free original hymns of their sexism and God-talk, for example, in an effort for our worship to be more inclusive.

The changed lyrics I am thinking of are to the old African American song, “There Is More Love Somewhere.” I have heard it sung by UUs as “There is more love right here.”

And as much explaining as I have done from the pulpit about understanding and respecting the history and context of the song, I field questions from congregation members who protest the song’s words when we sing it as is.

There is much to be troubled…

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