16 Children’s Books For ‘Spiritual But Not Religious’ Families

Source: 16 Children’s Books For ‘Spiritual But Not Religious’ Families

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What is essential is invisible to the eye.

I was so excited to find this recording of my all time favorite story, The Little Prince.  I share it here with you in the hopes that you will find is as enjoyable and inspiring as I have and that you will share it with someone special.

Mamma Dog and the Pile of Yarn

outreach centerThis morning, at my church, we held a ribbon cutting ceremony for our new Community Outreach Center.  The center is an expansion of the Matthew 25:40 Mission that has been a part of our church’s work in the community.  The mission literally grew out of it’s Director’s (Mark Cook) trunk.  The Outreach Center will provide a warming center during the day for our community’s homeless population while connecting people in need to the support and services they need.

As part of the church service that preceded the ribbon cutting, the kids participated in a Blessing of the Blankets.  Just before Rev. Christana Wille McKnight lead the congregation in the blessing, I got to tell this story:

Once upon a time, on a day very much like today – rainy, windy and cold – there was a dog who didn’t have a place to live.  On this rainy, windy, cold day the dog laid down in an alleyway to get a little relief from the weather.  Nearby was a pile of yarn that someone had thrown away.  The pile of yarn saw the dog and rolled over to it and tried to cover the shivering animal.  It meant well and it tried really hard.  It helped a bit.  The dog felt a little warmer and a little drier and was grateful for the effort.  But still, the dog was damp and chilly.

Later that evening, a young woman cut through the alleyway on her way home and saw the dog, covered in yarn, shivering quietly.  She picked up the dog, yarn and all, and brought her home.  While the dog huddled in the corner of the kitchen, the young woman gathered up all the yarn and brought it to her loom.  Turns out the woman was an artist and had a real skill for weaving.  Within a few hours she wove that yarn – in and out, left and right – until she had woven a beautiful blanket.  When she was finished, she took that blanket to the corner of the kitchen, wrapped up the dog and went to bed. puppies under blanket

In the morning, the young woman came down to the kitchen to find that the dog had given birth to 3 adorable puppies.  The blanket was now wrapped around the Momma dog and her 3 puppies, keeping the whole family warm.

What makes a blanket different from a pile of yarn is vision, leadership and organization.  We must always be grateful to those who share their vision, extend their leadership and bring organization to our pile of efforts.  For it is through these gifts that our pile of yarn becomes more beautiful, more durable and more effective.

The 3 sisters – Hope, Faith and Love

???????????????????????????????????????The theme in February at First Parish Church in Taunton is Hope.  I have been thinking a lot about Hope and Faith lately.  This story, which I told at our Time for All Ages, came from that thinking.

This is a story about three sisters – Hope, Faith and Love.  I think their parents might have been hippies.  Every day, the sisters work to fight injustice.  They march against unfair treatment.  They help kids being bullied.  They sit with parents with sick kids.  They help families struggling to pay the rent and put food on the table.

Each morning, Hope wakes up first and, in her wee happy voice, she sings, “I hope today will be a good day.”  Her cheery optimism helps get her sisters up and ready for the day.  The sisters sing together over breakfast, hum while washing up and dance while getting dressed to start the day.  Bellies full, clean and neat, the sisters head to the door.  Sometimes Hope’s sunny mood dims a little as she considers their work ahead and the challenges they might face.  “I hope today will be a good day, but I am not sure.”

Faith chirps up in a voice strong and determined.  “I have faith that our work matters.  I have faith that things will get better.”  Hand in hand, the three sisters set out to protest, to protect, to educate, to feed and clothe, and to heal the broken places in the world.   They march arm in arm.  They speak truth to power.  They hug and cry with the suffering.  They sing with the brave.  They keep their hands busy with their life giving, world saving work.

The sisters have many friends and partners, but not everyone welcomes them.  Sometimes they meet people who put them down.  Sometimes they meet people who push them down.  Sometimes they are even beat down.  In these dark times even Hope’s optimism and Faith’s determination waiver.

Love in usually pretty quite.  Usually she shows her strength with a gentle touch, a loving smile or a warm embrace.  In the dark times, when the sisters are at their lowest, she shows her true power.  “Get up!” she shouts.  “Stand up!”  “Keep moving!”  When the sisters are almost at the breaking point, it is Love’s power that brings them through.  Love reminds them  why they work so hard every day.  Love reminds them of all the wonderful people with whom they struggle.  Love reminds of all the beauty they work to protect.  With Love, they rise.  With Love, they push forward.

And so the sisters work together each day.  We will find them when we work together for justice.  We will find them when we act with compassion.  We will find them when we stand up and we will find them when we are shoved down.  Each contributes in their own way to help us do what we know is right.

The letter to Santa

One of my responsibilities as the Director of Religious Education at First Parish Church in Taunton is to tell a story or share some thoughts during the worship service.  We call this the “Time for All Ages.”  This past Sunday, I struck  upon a gem.

There once was a 3rd grade teacher – Mrs. Mello – who asked her students to write a letter to Santa with their Christmas Wish List as one of their assignments.  Third graders are learning to write letters and this seemed like a good way to get the kids excited about their lesson.  The children got busy right away.  When the letters were all written, Mrs. Mello collected them and brought them home to correct that evening.

After dinner, she sat in her comfy chair, got out her red pen, and started correcting and grading the letters.  She skimmed through several letters, not really focused on the stream of “Please bring me a new bike…new doll…new action figure…new computer game…”  It wasn’t the content of the letters that was important.  She was looking to make sure that they used capital letters at the beginning of the sentence, punctuation at the end and enough verbs, adjectives and nouns in the middle.  One letter, though, drew her in.

It started off sweetly enough…

Dear Santa,

Thank you for all the wonderful gifts you brought last year.

But then it took an unexpected turn…

This year, could you make sure that me and my family have a warm, dry home.  And could you make sure that my whole family is safe and healthy.  I would really like it if my whole family could be together for Christmas and there is enough food on the table for everyone to get their fill.

I also want a dry pair of boots so my feet don’t get wet when I walk to school and a warm coat so I won’t be cold.

Your friend,

Billy

Mrs. Mello was shocked and saddened.  She had no idea that Billy and his family were going through such a hard time.  She picked up her phone and called Billy’s home right away.

When Billy’s mom answered the phone, Mrs. Mello shared with her the contents of Billy’s letter and asked if there were anything that the school could do to help her family.  Billy’s mom replied that she had no idea why Billy would write a letter like that because the family was doing just fine.  They had a warm, dry home.  No one was sick and there was plenty of food.  Billy had nice boots and a warm coat.

Billy’s mom thanked Mrs. Mello for her call and after saying “Goodbye” she went to Billy’s room to ask him about the letter.  “Billy, why would you write a letter asking Santa for a warm, dry home?  Why would you ask for the family to be healthy and well fed?  Why do you want dry boots and a warm coat?  You already have all of those things.”

Billy looked at his Mom with a big smile and said, “Yeah, isn’t that cool.  I already have everything I want.”

Play ball!

Image     Once upon a time, there was a girl named Karen whose parents signed her up to play baseball.  Both of her parents loved baseball and lots of kids in their community played baseball so it seemed like a good idea.

Karen started going to practices and the games.  Some of the kids were nice, but not all of them.  The coach was not.  Most of the time he yelled.  He yelled at Karen and her friends to run faster, swing straighter and stop dropping the ball.  When they didn’t run faster he made them run more.  When they didn’t swing straighter, he kept them late at practice .  When they dropped the ball, he threw it harder.

Karen played baseball for years.  Partly because her parents liked the game and enjoyed watching her play.  Partly because she had some good friends on the team.  Karen played baseball for years.  Karen got yelled at for years.  She ran extra laps, stayed late at practice and tried not to drop the ball.  Karen played baseball for years and learned to hate baseball.  She just felt like she was never good enough.

Eventually, Karen stopped playing baseball.  She stopped watching baseball because it reminded her of how unhappy it had made her feel.  In fact, she pretty much gave up on all sports.  The idea of being on a team with a coach just brought back too many unpleasant memories.  She had friends who played sports – some baseball, others football, soccer, volleyball, but not Karen.  No matter how much they told her about the fun they had, the health benefits, parties afterwards…Karen wanted nothing to do with it.  She had been hurt too much.

Some people’s experience with church has been similar to Karen’s experience with baseball.  They’ve been yelled at.  They’ve been hurt.  They’ve been made to feel like they are no good.  They’ve given up.

For those of us who have discovered that we can love the game again, how do we share that love?  How can we show them that there are coaches who don’t yell and teams where all the kids are nice?  How do we let them know that practice can be fun, not hurtful?

How do we convince those who have given up to give it another try?

A foundation of trust

The theme for this month at First Parish Church in Taunton is Trust.

I remember my early days of Psychology courses and recalled that a guy named Eric offered that we learn different lessons about the world at different ages as we grow up.  He taught that the first lesson we learn as babies is about trust.  If babies are fed when they are hungry and changed when they are wet and held when they are scared they will learn the world and people in it can be trusted.  Because it is the first lesson we learn, it could be thought of as the foundation for everything we learn after that.

That got me thinking about this story:

There once was a village far, far, far, far away.  One of the rules in this village is that when someone wanted to start a family, he or she had to build a house and live in it for a year.  One day, a young man decided that he wanted to start a family.  He decided that he wanted his family to be able to see the ocean every day, so he built his house on the beach.  Predictably, as soon as the first strong rain came the sand under his house began to shift and his house fell down within a couple of months.

Luckily, he was not killed.foundation

Having learned from his mistake, he gathered up a pile of rocks and bricks and built his house on the pile.  This worked out pretty well for several months but within 6 months, the pile began to shift and this house fell down, too.

Luckily, he was not killed.

The young man was determined and decided to give it another try.  This time, he built a strong foundation.  He built his house and moved in.  The house on the strong foundation stood for the entire year despite the rain and windstorms.  He found a partner, started his family and they all lived happily ever after.

How will you use your powers?

How will you use your energy today?
How will you use your talents today?

Will you lift people up or put  them down?
Will you open doors or slam them shut?
Will you reach out or push away?
Will you build up or tear down?
Will you build bridges or widen the divide?
Will you try to understand or close your mind?
Will you heal or will you hurt?

How will you use your powers today?

The Nurturing Tree

Bravo! I have always been uncomfortable with “The Giving Tree” and this remake is splendid. A few illustrations and it would make a great bed time story for our kids.

Yet another story in the Giving Speaks series–Creating a Giving Culture–One Story at a Time–featuring guest author Dr. Jerry D. Wright*

The Nurturing Tree

Once there was a boy who really enjoyed a tree.

He enjoyed the roughness of its bark when he climbed it.

He enjoyed the springiness of its branches when he swung on them.

He enjoyed the crackle, the smell and the pillowy feeling of its leaves when he gathered them into a big pile and jumped into them, in the fall of the year.

He enjoyed the crunch and tart taste of its apples when he bit into its ripe fruit.

And when the sun was hot, he enjoyed sitting in its shade, leaning against its sturdy trunk, thinking about all the things he hoped to do and have and be as he grew older.

The tree enjoyed the boy, too.

She enjoyed watching him…

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It’s not the end of the world

The sun shines behind the storm

A funny thing happened on the way to work this morning.

I do my best thinking while driving.  As a social worker and a parent, that means I get a lot of time to think.  Sometimes I think simple things like what I am going to do when I get to where I am going, sometimes I ponder deep, spiritual and social matters.  If I am going to be delivering the message at church on Sunday, I usually get it sorted out in my head while driving then put it on paper when it’s just about finished.  Sometimes I get a good idea for Story for All Ages to share at our worship service on Sunday morning and get the details of the story sorted out on the road.

This morning was different.  I was just driving along and I heard a song on the radio in which the singer tells about feeling broken hearted.  It’s a pretty common theme in music, across just about every genre.  For whatever reason, I started to think about people who are in a dark place and start to feel that it will always be that way.  I was really disturbed by the thought.

Then it hit me.  It came all at once – like a massive iTunes download – straight past my brain and into my heart.  I drove straight to my computer and typed it up.  I have to admit that I was moved, emotionally, while I was typing it.

Now, you have to understand something here.  I don’t, and have never, written poetry or song lyrics or anything of the sort.  I have been known to be a bit of a story teller and I preach a pretty good sermon now and then.  This was different.

It was given to me.  I’m just passing it along.

I know you’re feeling broken and burned
It’s like your whole world is in ruins
You can’t see past the rubble and dust
But I see you and you’re beautiful and strong
So follow my voice

I’m right here, calling to you
There will be joy
The sun shines behind the storm
There will be good times and laughter
There will be joy, again, for you.

I saw you fall into that pit.
Frightened and covered in mud and blood
Nothing but cold walls closing in
But if you just look up, you’ll see me
Listen to my voice

I’m right here, reaching for you
There will be joy
The sun shines behind the storm
There will be good times and laughter
There will be joy, again, for you.

I see you stumbling in the darkness
Tripping, falling, bleeding, crying
Can’t see the sun through your swollen eyes
I’ve been there and I know a way through
So follow my voice

I’m right here, waiting for you
There will be joy
The sun shines behind the storm
There will be good times and laughter
There will be joy
again
for you.

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